Category Archives: Onboarding

Employee Engagement Intelligence Briefing: 2017.01.09 – 2017.01.13

Declassified folder - Wikimedia CommonsI’m Simpson…Gregory F Simpson, Agent In Engagement.  Below is the latest intelligence briefing on employee engagement. Follow @agtinengagement to stay current with the latest updates.

 

 

“These assets have been declassified and should be distributed to fellow “Agents” for review.”

 

 

SPOTLIGHT ARTICLE

How Middle Managers Can Boost Employee Engagement And Customer Experience 

Forbes: “[W]hat holds back many organisations efforts to improve their employee engagement? Well, according to Gallup, 70% percent of the variance between top quartile and bottom quartile performing companies, in terms of employee engagement, can be explained by the quality of that organisation’s managers. So, what should firms do? Should they be investing more in their front-line and middle managers?”

 


 

 

 

The Complete Guide to Employee Net Promoter Score (eNPS Tips)

Employee Connect: “Organizations wish to have employees who put in their earnest endeavors to provide amazing service to its customers. But how do you measure employee loyalty and what drives the decision one way or another? Enter the concept known as the employee Net Promoter Score (eNPS).”

 

 

 

3 Ways To Build A Culture Of Ownership

Halogen Software: “To own something means you have embraced it as yours and are personally invested in the outcome. Ownership is driven by the individual, while accountability is driven by managers or leaders. When someone on your team takes ownership of a project, you have confidence that you can count on them to deliver what they have promised.”

 

 

 

The Worst Way To Engage Millennials With Feedback And How To Avoid It

Forbes: “Companies of all sizes recognize the ineffectiveness of the annual review and the benefit of constant feedback and goal setting.”

 

 

 

12 ways to foster amazing employee engagement

Chartered Management Institute: “Employee engagement is key to company success, but how can you ensure your business gets it right?”

 

 

 

Employee Onboarding: The Complete Guide

OfficeVibe: “We put together a complete guide to teach you everything you need to know about employee onboarding, so you can be sure that each new hire is successful.”

 

 

When Warren Buffett Hires, He Looks For These 3 Key Traits

LinkedIn Talent Blog: “The chairman, CEO and largest shareholder of Berkshire Hathaway, Buffett is one of the most successful investors in the world. But, his cleverness goes beyond smart investing – he’s also an incredible manager and has been able to recruit and build a team of people that have helped lead his company to success. And, he’s done this by focusing on three particular traits in potential hires: Intelligence, Energy, and Integrity.”

 

 

 

How Managers Can Set Up Employees For Victory

ERE Media: “Do your managers do everything possible to enable and empower employees to succeed, or do they let busyness and carelessness prevent employees from getting the information, clarity, and resources they need to succeed?”

 

 

Companies Don’t Have Effective Brand Ambassadors

Gallup: “Although the people who “experience” brands are generally identified as consumers, customers, shoppers or guests, there is a critical group that companies often overlook: the people who deliver brands and the experiences that come with them.”

 

 

 

Money Won’t Buy Engagement, But Here’s What Will

ERE Media: “Traditionally money was seen as the main incentive used to motivate employees. Employee engagement is not about the financial rewards you provide, it’s about the intrinsic motivators that drive people at your company.”

 

 

 

 

Fellow Agents, what are your thoughts on this intelligence? What do you have to add?  What other sources should be consulted? Make entries in the comments log below.

 

 

Let’s Engage! 

I’m Agent in Engagement Simpson…Gregory F Simpson.

Employee engagement is a critical mission. I hope I can count on your help! Subscribe to the RSS Feed to receive the latest intelligence/insights and/or register to make entries in the comments log.

Photo of Gregory F SimpsonYou can follow me @agtinengagement.
Email me at g…@a…t.com.
Connect via LinkedIn at LinkedIn.com/in/GregoryFSimpson.
Learn more about me at gregoryfsimpson.com.

 

P.S.  First contact? Welcome to the Agent In Engagement community. Explore and join fellow employee engagement operatives in targeting a known thief – alias: Disengagement. Together we can bring this thief to justice and make the world a better place for all companies and their employees.

Other recent Agent in Engagement data/reports by Agent Gregory F Simpson:

 

 

 

Comments Off on Employee Engagement Intelligence Briefing: 2017.01.09 – 2017.01.13

Filed under Employees, Infographic, Managers, Onboarding, Sr. Leadership

Employee Engagement Intelligence Briefing: 2016.03.14 – 2016.03.18

Restricted Declassified stamp - pixgood.com Employee EngagementI’m Simpson…Gregory F Simpson, Agent In Engagement.  Below is the latest intelligence briefing on employee engagement. Follow @agtinengagement to stay current with the latest updates.

 

 

“These assets have been declassified and should be distributed to fellow “Agents” for review.”

 

 

SPOTLIGHT ARTICLE

The Ten C’s of Employee Engagement according to SJS

Contact Centres: “The ten C’s of employee engagement can engage heads, hearts, and hands, Stephen Pace CEO of SJS Solutions explains.”

 


 

 

 

As Organizational Design Evolves, Recognition is There to Help

Recognize This!: “Organizations increasingly benefit from designs centered on networks of small teams. These models are a natural fit for similarly flexible and empowered approaches to recognition.”

 

 

 

Can March Madness Be Used to Boost Employee Morale?

The Cheat Sheet: “It’s worth considering what work-related benefits can come from allowing employees to get involved with March Madness and engage with each other on something other than project assignments or meeting agendas.”

 

 

 

Rethinking Talent and Technology

Human Resources Executive Online: “A visit to the Ultimate Software Connections customer conference highlights three areas in which HR leaders are — or should be — changing their approaches to talent challenges and rethinking ways technology can help.”

 

 

The 6 Factors That Drive Engagement for Managers

Tiny Pulse: “You can’t expect to have an engaged workforce if your managers aren’t engaged themselves. On the flip side, when managers are engaged, there’s a better chance your employees will be engaged too. So what drives employee engagement for managers? Let’s take a look at some of the things that make managers love their jobs.”

 

 

 

Taking a cue from top companies: better pay, better engagement 

Benefits Pro: “It’s a tale as old as the hills, one that still rings true: Employers think they’re paying their employees a fair wage, and employees disagree.”

 

 

 

[QUIZ] What’s Your Turnover Risk?

Globoforce: “a recent Towers Watson survey showed 50% of all organizations globally reported difficulty retaining their high-potential and top performers. In fact, according to the most recent SHRM/Globoforce report, retention is the #1 challenge faced by HR organizations—topping the list for the first time in the history of that survey.”

 

 

 

The Top 5 Signs Your Employee Onboarding Program Needs an Overhaul

Tiny Pulse: “If you haven’t revisited your onboarding program in quite some time, chances are you’ll need to make at least a few tweaks. Need some help? Here are five signs it’s time to overhaul your onboarding program right away.”

 

 

 

The Case for Developing Communication Skills in Managers: More Engagement, More Profits

Association for Talent Development: “The ATD Research report, The Coaching Approach: A Key Tool for Successful Managers, found that 69 percent of respondents use coaching to improve communication between managers and employees. Coaching requires the manager to practice providing continuous feedback using coaching conversations. It is important that managers practice soft skills, including communication, because these tend to be lacking in managers.”

 

 

 

 

How to Be the Team Leader You Wish You Had Starting Out

Bonusly: “You have a few choices. You can be one of the bosses you remember less than fondly from the past, or you can work to become the team leader you wish you had years ago. There are a few keys to achieving that goal. If given some genuine effort, they’ll pay massive dividends.”

 

 

Blowing Up Traditional Workplace Hierarchy With Sideways Management

Tiny Pulse: “We here at TINYpulse are predicting that managing sideways will be a growing trend in 2016. The top-down hierarchy has lost relevance — and smart organizations are looking for employees to push their peers to become better professionals. By allowing employees to exert more control, you can create a workplace that’s focused on accountability.”

 

 

 

The Importance of 1:1 Meetings — And What You Should Discuss in Them

Tiny Pulse: “Beyond engagement, one-on-ones provide great opportunities for managers to coach and train their employees. You can discuss an employee’s weekly performance and offer a few tidbits of advice as to how they could do better next week. Now that you understand the necessity of one-on-one meetings, it’s time to figure out what needs to be discussed in order for such engagements to be most productive.”

 

 

The Discipline of Employee Engagement

Maritz Motivation: “Employee engagement isn’t rocket science – you don’t need an MBA to make it happen. It’s a discipline – one that calls for MBWA (management by walking around) to be successful.”

 

 

 

True Grit: Q+A with Caroline Adams Miller

Globoforce: “What makes someone “gritty”? Is it possible to build more grit into our workplace? And how can we raise performance standards while building compassionate, human-focused work environments? These are some of the questions we asked WorkHuman speaker Caroline Adams Miller, a positive psychology coach who’s worked with senior executives, professional athletes, and politicians. Caroline shares tips for giving effective praise, the opposite of grit, and the most damaging kind of feedback.”

 

 

 

The Secrets of Low Turnover Companies [Infographic]

High Ground: “One metric often used to assess the health and attractive power of an organization is its turnover rate. Measured as the percentage of employees in a workforce who leave during a set period of time, turnover rate reflects employee engagement at a certain company. Turnover rate is a top concern for all HR professionals and organizational leaders. The question is, what can be done to sustain or improve the rate?”

 

 

Why Employees And Management Have Such Different Ideas About Company Culture

Fast Company: “A new survey illustrates the wide gap between the opinions of workers and management on what’s important to creating a great culture.”

 

 

 

People Analytics Speeding Up Employee Engagement

CXO Today: “Rishi Rana, General Manager, India and APAC, SumTotal Systems, A Skillsoft Company in a conversation with CXOtoday explains the recent trends in HR analytics and how people analytics lead to better employee satisfaction and engagement.”

 

 

 

VIDEO: Your Employees Want to Be Known

Convenience Store News: “In the third installment of its employee engagement video series, the North America NACS Council of the Coca-Cola Retailing Research Council (CCRRC) shows convenience store retailers how their employees, just like everyone else, want to be known as the unique people they are.”

 

 

 

4 Profit and Loss Benefits of Employee Engagement

Business 2 Community: “As an employer and a leader, you need to have an active role in making employee engagement possible and sustainable. The benefits of employee engagement help your company on many levels, including your bottom line.”

 

 

 

The Toll a Terrible Boss Takes on an Employee’s Well-Being

Tiny Pulse: “A nightmare boss is, well, a nightmare to work for. It’s easy for people to talk about not letting work affect their personal lives, but is it really all that possible? Thanks to technology, the line that separates work and personal life is blurred, and it’s become more and more difficult to separate the two.”

 

 

 

 

 

Fellow Agents, what are your thoughts on this intelligence? What do you have to add?  What other sources should be consulted? Make entries in the comments log below.

 

Let’s Engage!

I’m Agent in Engagement Simpson…Gregory F Simpson.

Employee engagement is a critical mission. I hope I can count on your help! Subscribe to the RSS Feed to receive the latest intelligence/insights and/or register to make entries in the comments log.

Photo of Gregory F SimpsonYou can follow me @agtinengagement.
Email me at g…@a…t.com.
Connect via LinkedIn at LinkedIn.com/in/GregoryFSimpson.
Learn more about me at gregoryfsimpson.com.

 

P.S.  First contact? Welcome to the Agent In Engagement community. Explore and join fellow employee engagement operatives in targeting a known thief – alias: Disengagement. Together we can bring this thief to justice and make the world a better place for all companies and their employees.

Other recent Agent in Engagement data/reports by Agent Gregory F Simpson:

 

 

Comments Off on Employee Engagement Intelligence Briefing: 2016.03.14 – 2016.03.18

Filed under Employees, Infographic, Managers, Onboarding, Sr. Leadership, Videos

Are Your New Managers Positioned for Success?

superhero_takingoffThere it was in black and white.

“Congratulations are in order! On behalf of the Leadership Team, I am pleased to recognize our recent promotions. Please join me in congratulating each of these individuals below on a job well done.

To those who were promoted…Thank you for your hard work and dedication to our clients and to our Company. Your promotion represents a significant milestone. Best wishes for continued success in your career.”

Finally!  It’s official.

I’m a manager! I felt like a superhero.

 

Bring It On!
Over the next week, I received several congratulatory emails from senior leaders. Nice! And then they started. I received emails giving me access to an opportunity management system, a budget system, and a management portal.  Oh, and another email let me know that I now had access to additional functionality in the performance management system.  Great!  I met my new team and spent a brief amount of time with the outgoing manager.  Anything else?  Of course, things just kept coming.

 

OK! Now what? 
I was beginning to feel a bit overwhelmed.  I assumed the training invitations would arrive…they didn’t come.  I asked other managers for help…they were helpful and didn’t have a lot of time to give me.  I searched for training in the learning management system…there was none specific to the applications to which I now had access.

 

Seriously?
How can companies expect their new managers to be successful if they aren’t provided with the information they need? Hours and hours are spent on evaluating whether or not to promote an employee.  Performance management records are studied, meeting are held to discuss potential management candidates, numbers are run to determine the financial aspects of what the company can afford/the forecasted needs of the company based on the projected pipeline of work, etc.  And then, once the decision is made and the new managers are informed, everything goes back to normal from a company standpoint. The company and its leaders fail to follow through to ensure that the new managers have what is needed to be successful.

In most companies, promotion to management is based on the employees previous work effort/success.  No evaluation of management skills is considered and we know that not everyone is management material. Even if the new manager has the potential to be effective, companies do little to help them learn/enhance management skills.

 

The Result
Without proper manager onboarding, a company may find itself with lower engagement scores on the next employee engagement survey, i.e. more disengaged employees.  Managers play a key role in engagement since they have (or should have) direct contact with their employees.  If a new manager isn’t suited to a management role, the employees will disengage or possibly leave.

 

The Goal
Manager selection should be a priority.  After the right candidate is selected, the focus should shift to manager development.  The better your new manager onboarding process, the more effective new managers can be. And, the more effective new managers can be, the higher the likelihood you have a more engaged workforce.

 

What are your thoughts on new managers and what they need to be successful in their new roles?  What experiences can you share with other Agents?

 

P.S.  First time here? Welcome to the Agent In Engagement site. Thanks for taking the time to stop by!  I hope you’ll explore the rest of the site.Let me know what employee engagement topics interest you.

Other recent Agent in Engagement articles by Gregory F Simpson:

 

 

Let’s Get Engaged!

I’m Agent in Engagement Simpson…Gregory F Simpson.

I’m excited about this opportunity to connect with fellow “Agents.” Subscribe to the RSS Feed to receive the latest updates and/or register  to comment on posts.

 

GFS site photoYou can follow me @agtinengagement.
Email me at g…@a…t.com.
Learn more about me at www.gregoryfsimpson.com.

 

 

Comments Off on Are Your New Managers Positioned for Success?

Filed under Employees, Managers, Onboarding, Sr. Leadership

Onboarding: The Third Phase of Engagement

Phase 3In the 7 Phases of Engagement, I proposed that each phase ties directly to the employee lifecycle and has the potential to impact the success of a company in terms of its ability to engage employees.

 

Today, we’ll look at the third phase of engagement: Onboarding.

Onboarding Phase of Engagement

Onboarding is the most crucial of the 7 Phases of Engagement.  While the hiring process phase is the beginning of the employee relationship, the onboarding phase sets the stage for the rest of the employee’s time at the company. It is crucial that there be a formal and well thought-out process for to help new employees assimilate.

 

What is onboarding?

Onboarding is the way companies induct new employees into their organizations.  The goal is to get these new employees up to speed as quickly as possible so that they can begin to make a contribution to their companies.

The onboarding phase begins with the acceptance of a job offer by the new employee. Keep in mind that the job offer can impact the engagement level of the new employee.  In his article, “Exploding job offers: It’s time to eliminate exploding job offers,” Adam Grant challenges the thinking of employeers who draw out the interviewing process only to give candidates a short amount of time to accept an offer before it expires.  In it, he explains how this type of job offer is “… counterproductive for employers: they don’t succeed in landing, motivating, or retaining high performers.”1

 

Employment Status and Engagement

In a perfect situation, the employee is given time to consider the offer and is hired in a non-probationary role. This role is the most beneficial in terms of employee engagement because the company and the employee make a mutual and equal commitment to each other’s success.

However, there are two other employment statuses in which companies hold the upper hand: temp to hire and probationary periods.  Companies use these options as a way to hedge against their hiring decisions when they are not sure that the employee will be able to perform the role and/or fit into the culture of the company.

In temp to hire roles, temporary employees cannot be treated as a regular employee which often means that they will not go through the standard onboarding process. Onboarding will probably be a one-off process IF there is even a process. Temporary employees will also be at a disadvantage since they won’t have access many of the resources to which company employees have. However, the company will hold temporary workers accountable to the same standards as all other employees. If the goal is eventually hire these employees, then how can a temp to hire role not serve to disengage the temporary hire?

When companies use probationary periods, they are again demonstrating a lack of faith in their hiring process. While not as severe as a temp-to hire, the new employee is under pressure to fit in during the probationary period. By not wanting to rock the boat, these employees may hold back ideas and effort as a way to make it through the period.

 

Onboarding Process

There are many companies that use a “sink or swim” approach.  Employees are thrown into a role and whatever happens happens. To begin to engage employees, however, companies must put thought and effort into their onboarding process. Consider orientation feedback surveys, talk employees that have recently gone through the process, look at new hire retention statistics, etc. to better perfect the process.

 

Orientation/ First days

New employees are eager to understand their role, to learn more about the company and its culture, and most of all, to make positive impact. Their first day can either excite them or overwhelm them.

Typically, companies welcome new employees through an orientation program on their first (or first few) days. In my experience, employees receive mountains of paperwork, endure endless lectures on core values, receive their laptops, hear from a company executive and then are set-free to start their work. That can be overwhelming.

 

Mountains of paperwork

From a paperwork perspective, why not get that out of the way before their first day? Last year, I attended the Workforce Live-NYC program where I met Todd Owens, President and COO of TalentWise, a technology company that automates the hiring process including the associated paperwork.  By doing so, the paperwork can be completed prior to the first day allowing a better use of time during orientation and relieving the new hire from the stress of having to focus on paperwork.

 

Endless Lectures

Orientation gives companies the opportunity to discuss important topics including their company’s core values. One of my previous companies had 6 core values and an hour was devoted to discussing each one in orientation.  I agree that employees need to be familiar with and understand the company’s core values. In orientation, I think they should be woven into the normal discussion and tied to actual examples of how they’ve been applied. Given the amount of information provided in orientation, consider how much of it will be remembered afterwards.

I enjoyed volunteering to teach the core value modules. I would spend 30 minutes on the specific core value I was teaching. Yes, I rushed the canned presentation and went off-script by adding specific examples of how it applied in my experience. I used the remaining 30 minutes to connect with the group by answering any questions the new hires had. Based on the feedback, those 30 minutes were the most valuable of the entire day. While some of the questions would have been addressed in other parts of orientation, many were just basic “how does it really work?” questions.  Again, find out what works best during your orientation program and tailor it to the needs of your new hires.

 

Company Technology

New hires always eagerly await the time they will receive their new computers, phones, etc.  It is important that companies have all needed technologies ready and available for new employees.  When a company is not prepared, it sends a message that the employee is not a top priority.  Don’t disengage new hires from day one.

 

Give People An Out

When I was reading Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passions, and Purpose2, by Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh, I came across “The Offer.”   Zappos is the leading destination in online apparel and footwear sales and is known for its outstanding customer service. In Why Zappos Pays New Employees to Quit–And You Should Too, Bill Taylor, in a Harvard Business Review blog post, discusses how “The Offer” helps Zappos maintain its culture by allowing new hires to take a cash bonus to leave the company.  Those taking “The Offer”“…obviously don’t have the sense of commitment they are looking for.” 3
 

 

After Orientation – Manager Role

Once orientation is over, it is the direct manager’s responsibility to create a personal onboarding plan with new employees. It simply can’t be left to the company alone since most companies assume the onboarding process ends when orientation is completed

It will be the little things that make the most impact on the engagement of new hires.  Below is a checklist of items that should be considered:

 Computer – The employee should have their computer but may not understand the sites that will be the most used/beneficial for their role.  Help employees tailor their laptops to be the most effective.

Workspace – Hopefully, the new employee will have a clean, stocked workspace so that they can focus on the role. Help the employee understand the phone system, make sure they have keys to lock their desks, etc.

Team members – Do coworkers know the employee is starting? Devise a plan to introduce the new hire to the rest of the team. Polaroid, in a commercial, showed how using Polaroid photo’s of coworkers helped the new employee feel more welcomed while helping him put faces with names. Giving coworkers as much information as you can about the new hire will help them better connect once the person starts. Doing the same for the employee will help everyone build stronger connections. Lunches, coffees, and cocktails are other opportunities to connect

Coworkers – There will be people outside of the team with which the new employee will be working.  Arrange introductions for key coworkers.

Expectations – Set expectations and schedule follow-up meetings with the new employee. This will keep everyone on the same page and shows that the manager is actively involved in helping the employee be successful. New employees crave feedback.  They want to know what they are doing well and understand where they have opportunity to improve.

 

Onboading is essential to employee engagement since it set the foundation of all that is to follow was the employee progresses within the company. I challenge you to review your onboarding program and see how engaging it is.

 

 

 

1 Grant, Adam. “Exploding job offers: It’s time to eliminate exploding job offers.” LinkedIn. 13 Jan. 2014. Web. 1 Apr. 2014.

2 Hsieh, Tony. (2010) Delivering Happiness: A Path to Profits, Passions, and Purpose. New York: Business Plus.

3  Taylor, Bill. “Why Zappos Pays New Employees to Quit–And You Should Too.” HBR Blog. 19 May 2008. Web. 1 Apr. 2014

 

 

P.S.  First time here? Welcome to the Agent In Engagement site. Thanks for taking the time to stop by!  I hope you’ll explore the rest of the site. Let me know what employee engagement topics interest you.
If you enjoyed this article, you may also like…

 

 

Let’s Get Engaged!

I’m Agent in Engagement Simpson…Gregory F Simpson.

I’m excited about this opportunity to connect with fellow “Agents.” Subscribe to the RSS Feed to receive the latest updates and/or register  to comment on posts.

 

GFS site photoYou can follow me @agtinengagement.
Email me at g…@a…t.com.
Learn more about me at www.gregoryfsimpson.com.

 

Comments Off on Onboarding: The Third Phase of Engagement

Filed under Book Reviews, Employees, Managers, Onboarding, Sr. Leadership

7 Phases of Engagement

One Thru Seven ChevronsYou may be familiar with my weekly employee engagement recap blog posts.  In them, I curate the best articles I run across in a given week.  I’ve found it interesting that most of these articles take a narrow approach to employee engagement.  They focus on topics related to those employed by a company.  I know.  I hear you.  You are saying, “Hello Greg, you have to work for a company to be called an employee and we are talking about EMPLOYEE engagement.” You’re right…and hear me out.

 

I propose there are actually seven phases of engagement and only four of them apply to actual employees.  Each phase ties directly to the employee lifecycle and has the potential to impact the success of a company in terms of its ability to engage employees.

The 7 Phases of Engagement

7 Phases of Engagement

 

While I’ll address each phase of engagement in greater detail in later posts, let me provide some context around what each of the phases entails.

 

In the Pre-hire Phase, there is an opportunity to engage future potential employees.  Companies need to set the stage to encourage qualified candidates to want to work with them.

 

Once someone decides to pursue a position with a company, they move into the Hiring Process Phase.  Since this will be the first direct contact between the potential employee and the company, impressions will make a big difference.  The company must live up to or exceed its Pre-hire Phase reputation.

 

The next four phases (Onboarding, Engagement, Promotion/Advancement, and Transition/Termination) apply to actual employees.

 

The employee is now part of the company and is eager to make a difference.  At this point, the employee is exposed to people outside of Human Resources and the hiring department.  The Onboarding Phase will set the tone for the next three phases of the engagement process.

 

Once onboarded, the Engagement Phase begins. This is where most of the articles written on employee engagement tend to focus.  This phase includes the bulk of the employee’s tenure with the company and will determine how quickly they arrive at the Transition/Termination Phase.

 

The Promotion/Advancement Phase is crucial as it begins a cycle.  Being in a new role, the company will need to loop back to the Onboarding Phase and then move to a new Engaging Phase in order to continue to engage the employee from a company and new role standpoint.

 

The employee continues to loop through the Onboarding, Engaging, and Promotion/Advancement Phases until the Transition/Termination Phase. At this point, the employee decides to leave the company or the company decides to let the employee go.  Either way, there is still an opportunity to engage the employee and move them to the final phase of engagement.

 

In the Alumni Phase, former employees are encouraged to maintain a positive relationship with the company for mutual gain.  It is possible that an alum will desire to return to the company and begin the Hiring Process all over again.

 

Each of the 7 phases provides engagement opportunities that can help a company deepen its relationship with potential, new, current, and former employees.  I hope you’ll come back next week when we’ll focus on the Pre-hire Phase.

 

 

What are your thoughts on the 7 Phases of Engagement?  Are there phases you would add, combine, and or remove?

 

 

P.S.  First time here? Welcome to the Agent In Engagement site. Thanks for taking the time to stop by!  I hope you’ll explore the rest of the site. Let me know what employee engagement topics interest you.

If you enjoyed this article, you may also like…

 

 

Let’s Get Engaged!

I’m Agent in Engagement Simpson…Gregory Simpson.

 

As an Agent in Engagement, my mission is to relieve the world of bad and ineffective managers.  I help companies and their employees succeed by focusing on how frontline and middle managers engage, manage, and develop their direct reports.

 

After years in the field, where I was honored for my employee engagement achievements with Fortune 150 consulting clients, I’m looking forward to returning to headquarters where I’ll continue to pursue my directive to improve employee engagement.

 

I’m excited about this opportunity to connect with fellow “Agents.” Subscribe to the RSS Feed to receive the latest updates and/or register  to comment on posts.

 

GFS site photoFollow me @agtinengagement.
Email me at g…@a…t.com.
Learn more about me at www.gregoryfsimpson.com.

 

 

Comments Off on 7 Phases of Engagement

Filed under Employees, Managers, Onboarding, Recruiting, Social Media, Sr. Leadership

Friday the 13th

Friday the 13thDo you suffer from Friggatriskaidekaphobia* also known as the fear of Friday the 13th? If so, today, December 13th, may not be your day. Not only is it a “Friday the 13th,” it is occurring in a year ending in “13”.

 

The fear associated with Friday the 13th is based on superstition – “that one event leads to the cause of another without any natural process linking the two events.”2 Friday the 13th is the result of people linking negative experiences to a specific day and date when there is no direct relation between them.  While the superstitions and fears of dates or numbers are not logical, they are perpetuated by our natural bias toward negativity.

 

Negativity bias is the psychological phenomenon by which humans have a greater recall of unpleasant memories compared with positive memories.”3  “Humans are thus biased toward behaving in a manner that will avoid negative experiences, and are much more likely to recall and be influenced by negative experiences of the past.”

 

If companies desire an engaged workforce, they must recognize the negativity bias of their employees. Given people’s tendency to recall negative incidents, it is vital that company leadership and direct managers focus on consistently communicating positive information, outcomes, and stories to their employees. “Occasional big positive experiences—say, a birthday bash—are nice. But they don’t make the necessary impact on our brain to override the tilt to negativity. It takes frequent small positive experiences to tip the scales.” 5 These “small positive experiences” could take place through daily MBWA (Management by Walking Around) interactions or by simply giving thanks to coworkers and direct reports.

 

Unfortunately, the relationship between the positive and the negative experiences is not one to one; a positive experience will not automatically cancel out a negative one. “The magic ratio is five to one. There needs to be five times as much positive feeling and interaction…to compensate for any negativity.”5

 

By recognizing the impact of negativity bias on employees and by working to quintuple the amount of positive communications, company leadership and direct managers will be in a better position to engage their employees.

 

How does negativity bias affect your company? What tips can you share on ways to communicate positive information to employees?

 

P.S.  Funny timing.  Last night (Thursday the 12th)  my computer updated to Windows 8.1 and this morning, I couldn’t access anything on my computer. After hours (literally) of trying to diagnose the problem and countless shutdown-restarts, I asked a friend to look at it.  When he did, he found no issues.  It worked perfectly. Should I believe this was all related to today being “Friday the 13th”? I think I’ll just chalk it up to the poor timing of an update.

 

 

*The name is derived from Frigga, the English name of the Norse goddess for whom “Friday” is named, and triskaidekaphobia, the fear of the number thirteen.1
1 Wikipedia.org. “Friday the 13th.” Wikepedia.org. Web. 12 December 2013.
2 Wikipedia.org. “Superstition.” Wikepedia.org. Web. 12 December 2013.
3 Wikipedia.org. “Negativity Bias.” Wikepedia.org. Web. 12 December 2013.
4 WiseGEEK.com. “What Is Negativity Bias?” WiseGEEK.com. Web. 12 December 2013.
5 Hara Estroff Marano. “Our Brain’s Negative Bias” Psychologytoday.com. 20 June 2003. Web. 12 December 2013.

 

P.S. – First time here? Welcome to the Agent In Engagement site. Thanks for taking the time to stop by!  I hope you’ll explore the rest of the site. Let me know what employee engagement topics interest you.

 

If you enjoyed this article, you may also like…

 

Let’s Get Engaged!

I’m Agent in Engagement Simpson…Greg Simpson.

My mission? To help companies succeed by focusing on how they engage, manage, and develop their employees.

My credentials? Award winning engagement work with Fortune 150 companies.

My next assignment? To come in from the field, the consulting field, and return to headquarters. There I’ll lead the ongoing battle against the greatest nemesis in every company – employee disengagement.

I’m excited about this opportunity to connect with fellow “Agents.” Subscribe to the RSS Feed to receive the latest updates and/or register if you
would like to comment on posts.

You can follow me @agtinengagement, email me at g…@a…t.com or learn more about me at www.gregoryfsimpson.com.

 

Comments Off on Friday the 13th

Filed under Employees, Managers, Onboarding, Programs, Recruiting, Social Media, Sr. Leadership