Category Archives: Conferences

2016: A Year In Review – Demonstrating Engagement Through an Infographic

Agent in Engagement Banner with 4 TargetsHow do you demonstrate your engagement? Engagement isn’t the sole responsibility of the company for which you work. You, as an individual, have a responsibility as well.

 

When I considered this, I came up with a plan to start tracking my professional and personal development activities outside of the workplace.

 

Measurement is the first step that leads to control and eventually to improvement. If you can’t measure something, you can’t understand it. If you can’t understand it, you can’t control it. If you can’t control it, you can’t improve it.

– H. James Harrington

 

 

After reviewing the information I collected, I decided to create an infographic or “a visual image such as a chart or diagram used to represent information or data.”1 The result was a means to illustrate the professional and personal development activities in which I engaged throughout the year. I began creating these annual infographics in 2013. If you are interested in doing the same, you can learn about the process I used by reading Continuing to Engage Through the Infographic.

 

Today, I’m releasing my fourth infographic: Gregory F Simpson – Agent In Engagement 2016: A Year In Review [Infographic]

Click here for the 2013 – 2016 infographics in pdf format:
Agent In Engagement 2013: A Year In Review [Infographic]
Agent In Engagement 2014: A Year In Review [Infographic]
Agent In Engagement 2015: A Year In Review [Infographic]
Agent In Engagement 2016: A Year In Review [Infographic]

 

What do think about my 2016 infographic? Given the number of activities and accomplishments I recorded, I was forced to prioritize the items to include. For example, I attended 40+ hours of webinars and 200+ hours of classes/lectures on professional development topics yet was not able to include that as a section given the limited space available.

 

Don’t wish it was easier, wish you were better. Don’t wish for less problems, wish for more skills. Don’t wish for less challenges, wish for more wisdom. The major value in life is not what you get. The major value in life is what you become. Success is not to be pursued; it is to be attracted by the person you become.

– Jim Rohn

 

I find this exercise very enlightening because it allows me to get an overview of how I spend my time. I can evaluate my success in achieving the goals I set for myself in 2016 as well as better focus on what I need to accomplish in 2017.

 

 

What do you think about using an infographic to tell your story? What do you do in terms of professional and personal development?

 

 

1 “infographic.” OxfordDictionaries.com. Oxford, 2014. Web. 26 Feb. 2014.

 

 

Let’s Engage! 

I’m Agent in Engagement Simpson…Gregory F Simpson.

Employee engagement is a critical mission. I hope I can count on your help! Subscribe to the RSS Feed to receive the latest intelligence/insights and/or register to make entries in the comments log.

Photo of Gregory F SimpsonYou can follow me @agtinengagement.
Email me at g…@a…t.com.
Connect via LinkedIn at LinkedIn.com/in/GregoryFSimpson.
Learn more about me at gregoryfsimpson.com.

 

P.S.  First contact? Welcome to the Agent In Engagement community. Explore and join fellow employee engagement operatives in targeting a known thief – alias: Disengagement. Together we can bring this thief to justice and make the world a better place for all companies and their employees.

Other recent Agent in Engagement data/reports by Agent Gregory F Simpson:

 

 

 

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Filed under Book Reviews, Conferences, Employees, Infographic, Managers, Sr. Leadership

Employee Engagement Intelligence Briefing: 2016.05.09 – 2016.05.13

DECLASSIFIED - Wikimedia Commons Employee EngagmentI’m Simpson…Gregory F Simpson, Agent In Engagement.  Below is the latest intelligence briefing on employee engagement. Follow @agtinengagement to stay current with the latest updates.

 

 

“These assets have been declassified and should be distributed to fellow “Agents” for review.”

 

 

SPOTLIGHT ARTICLE

Who Owns Employee Engagement: Managers or HR?

Tiny Pulse: “The case can be made that many different facets of an organization contribute to great employee engagement programs. Just because the HR department might “own” employee engagement, for example, doesn’t mean that managers can’t launch engagement initiatives of their own. On the other hand, just because a progressive manager may want to control the employee engagement program doesn’t mean that the HR department must be relegated to the sidelines.”

 


 

 

 

Employee Engagement Strategies That Work

Workable: “Here’s some employee engagement strategies that work for Limeade, The Hershey’s Company, Starbucks, General Mills, and Patagonia.”

 

 

 

Transparency is key to employee trust

Miami Herald:  “At any business, people are the No. 1 asset,” he says. “Everything comes down to communication with your people.”

 

 

 

Building Blocks: Job Resources and Demands [Video 11:30]

Coca-Cola Retailing Research Council: The fourth presentation [of the second phase of  the Coca-Cola Retailing Research Council North America NACS project on building a culture of engagement] on “making all necessary resources available to employees and shaping the demands managers place on workers.”

 

 

 

The Road to Loyalty Expo: I Want the Truth!

Martiz Motivation: “In weeks prior we’ve covered Inertia Loyalty and Mercenary Loyalty, so this week we’ll pick up where we left you last time with our third loyalty type, True Loyalty.”

 

 

 

Today’s Focus on Keeping Employees Engaged Spurs Surge of Innovation  

Bulldog Reporter: “New software and services that enable organizations to measure the mood of employees, manage peer-to-peer feedback and improve work highlight a surge of innovation focused on keeping employees engaged, according to new research from Bersin by Deloitte.”

 

 

 

Engagement Weekly: Creating Brand Ambassadors Through Engagement

Allen Communication: “Learn about the latest in employee engagement within various industries. This week’s influential authors look into the importance of “offboarding” programs, how leadership impacts employee morale and how management can give a sense of purpose to the job.”

 

 

 

Dr. Arnold Bakker on Employee Engagement and Work (Part 1)

Halogen Software: “Welcome to [the first of] a two-part interview with Arnold Bakker on employee engagement and work. I believe Dr. Bakker is one of the foremost researchers on work and engagement and has valuable insights to bring from academia to HR practitioners.”

 

 

 

How to Keep Engineers Happy, Engaged, and Motivated

Bonusly: “There aren’t too many major differences between what it takes to keep an engineer motivated and engaged and what it takes to do that for any other member of your team, but paying attention to the subtle differences can change the game.”

 

 

 

Social Age Talent Solutions Background and Framework Video (6:45)

YouTube: [Ignite Global]’s comprehensive framework for hiring, inspiring and leading top talent.

 

 

 

 

Fellow Agents, what are your thoughts on this intelligence? What do you have to add?  What other sources should be consulted? Make entries in the comments log below.

 

 

Let’s Engage!

I’m Agent in Engagement Simpson…Gregory F Simpson.

Employee engagement is a critical mission. I hope I can count on your help! Subscribe to the RSS Feed to receive the latest intelligence/insights and/or register to make entries in the comments log.

Photo of Gregory F SimpsonYou can follow me @agtinengagement.
Email me at g…@a…t.com.
Connect via LinkedIn at LinkedIn.com/in/GregoryFSimpson.
Learn more about me at gregoryfsimpson.com.

 

P.S.  First contact? Welcome to the Agent In Engagement community. Explore and join fellow employee engagement operatives in targeting a known thief – alias: Disengagement. Together we can bring this thief to justice and make the world a better place for all companies and their employees.

Other recent Agent in Engagement data/reports by Agent Gregory F Simpson:

 

 

 

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Filed under Conferences, Employees, Managers, Sr. Leadership, Videos

Glassdoor Employer Branding Summit Recap – Part 4 of 4

Employer Branding Summit 15

On Friday, September 25, 2015, Glassdoor hosted its second annual employer branding summit. For those unable to attend the event, Glassdoor offered a live stream which was recorded. Videos of the presentations are available on YouTube and the presentation materials have been posted on SlideShare. Below is a recap of presentations 10 – 12. This post will conclude the summit recap.

 

Glassdoor for Employers YouTube main link
Glassdoor for Employers SlideShare main link
Twitter hashtag: #GDSummit

 

 

The State of Employer Branding

Moderator: Louis Vong, VP of Digital Strategy, TMP Worldwide
Analysts: William Tincup, Principal Analyst of KeyInterval Research; Madeline Laurano, Chief Research Officer, Aptitude Research Partners; and Josh Bersin, Principal and Founder, Bersin by Deloitte
(Video – 56:05)

 

 

Q: Companies in the news: Amazon (New York Times (NYT) Article), Netflix (Maternal leave expansion), HP (dress code). Does controversy and being in the news affect the employer brand?

Other examples include Volkswagon (emissions) and Starbucks (tuition).

Josh Bersin (JB): You shouldn’t judge the stories unless you really know what is going on. Use Glassdoor to see their rating and to read the commentary. People self-select to work at any given company.

Madeline Laurano (ML): We tend to hear more about companies that talk and not enough of companies that are listeners – those realizing that they need to make changes.

William Tincup (WT): Brands must be consistent.

 

 

Q: Was the NYT article helpful to Amazon?

WT: Amazon article was good for their brand. They probably got a boost in sales and probably garnered more positive comments on Glassdoor.

ML: Wished that Amazon leadership had owned their culture instead of trying to pretend it is something it is not.

JB: The best part of the NYT article was that it allows an opportunity for HR Leaders to have a conversation with their CEOs about culture.

 

 

Q: Is dress code important as a brand and a culture?

JB: If look at the Net Promoter Score on Glassdoor and correlate the other questions against it, the highest correlation is with leadership. Management is second and third is career development.  At the bottom is work environment and compensation & benefits.

WT: We all adhere to some social mores. Self-selection involved.

JB: Covering – not bring whole self to work/hiding who you are is a significant issue in the area of  Diversity and Inclusion but dress code is minor.

 

 

Q: Consumer Brand and Employer Brand importance?  Example: GE consumer advertising is really recruitment advertising.

ML: Companies tend to have a siloed approach to both types of brand.

JB: The relationship is backwards. To be a great business you have to have a business strategy, a product, and an employee strategy that appeals to customers. Management should focus on improving employee engagement and that will boost their employer brand.

WT: Everything you do in the company is brand. All sub-brands within the company (employer, consumer, etc.) must be congruent.

 

 

Q: Best Places to Work: Are all the perks important?

WT: Best Places to Work/ Great Places to Work are a sham. It’s an award that can be won but can backfire if you don’t back it up.

JB: Most data shows real retention and engagement is driven by career opportunities, respect, recognition, empowerment – all within management’s control. Most companies are reengineering how people are managed because they recognize the importance of engaged employees.

 

 

Q: Should employer branding appeal to all five senses like consumer brands do?

JB: HR needs to apply design thinking. They need to understand the experiences people have throughout the lifecycle.

WT: The hardest thing is there are no best practices. It must be personalized to your company, employees, and customers. Your arm is the industry; your fingers are companies; and the fingerprint on your index finger is your employer brand. It’s unique.

JB: HR needs to be more innovative and creative. Test and iterate.

WT: Failure is a given so companies must give things the latitude to fail.

ML: Crowdsourcing (getting input from many) is important.

 

 

Q: Should we create employer brands specific to certain departments or audiences? Is it OK for them to be different?

JB: Different parts of company can have different cultures and styles. That’s OK.

WT: Is there a culture or cultures. He believes there are cultures. Need to make it hard for bad managers to exist – would like for Glassdoor to dive deeper into who can be rated.

 

 

Q: Is your manager still the number one reason people leave a company?

JB: No, it is one of the factors but not the top reason. Today, managers are more removed from their people. Openness of feedback will help managers improve.

ML: Awareness of how you are perceived as a manager is important. Managers also need tools on how to better develop, encourage, and recognize their employees.

 

 

Q:  How do you measure your employer brand?

WT: You know things are working well when it is easy to recruit.

JB: When candidates come to you because they understand who you are and have specific reasons about why they want to work for you, it means you are getting the message out there.  Suggestion: ask candidates why applied to your company versus a competitor, you’ll know how well they understand your message.

 

 

Q: Can companies be too open/too transparent?

WT: No one is 100% authentic. No can tell you everything that is going on in someone’s mind and wouldn’t want them too either. You can be close but never 100%.

JB: Transparency is wonderful and inevitable. Need to be careful: 1) Don’t say anything online that wouldn’t say to a person. 2) Confidential information can be released. 3) Be aware of sexual harassment and other legal issues.  Anonymous transparency needs rules.

WT: Not rules but values.

ML: Certain industries where there have to be rules.

 

 

Q: Given the effort put into content marketing, are we targeting the right people, i.e. those that follow your careers site on social media?

ML: Can’t put all your eggs in one basket. Have to target different audiences using different tools.

JB: Like marketing, your campaigns will change over time.  Not just about numbers but the groups you are trying to target.

WT: “Talking to” is not the point. It’s the interaction that people desire.

 

 

Audience Questions

Q: Thoughts on the Google salary publishing story.

WT: Compensation is emotional. Values discrepancies (what is the culture?) or compression issues (pay inequity due to environment when hired) newer people more than tenured hires because of economic turnaround (hard to manage)

JB: Consider the company that decided to raise their minimum salary to 70K – no one was happy.

ML: Equal versus equitable. Organizations need to think about how they handle sensitive information.

 

 

Q: How does having different internal cultures play out for a company?

JB: For large corporations, it is a common problem as companies try to improve communication, talent sharing, etc. across divisions, geographies, etc.  Leaders have to be interconnected and force those interactions to happen at the lowest levels.

WT: As long as there is elasticity around company values, sub-cultures are OK.

 

 

Q:  What are you seeing in terms of transparency with Diversity and Inclusion (D&I information? Pitfalls?

JB: Great that companies are publishing D&I information because shows people that it’s a difficult problem to solve. Data allows discussion. Companies have a disconnect between how well they think they are doing versus how they are actually doing. Data will help close that gap.

WT: Approach to D&I is a sham. Most focus only race.  Age, gender, geographical location, etc. are other considerations.

JB: Soon-to-be released two-year talent management study: highest performing companies focused on D&I.

 

 

Q: What is your take on Intel spending millions to attract women?

ML: Lots of companies trying to attract women. Intel is just more vocal about it.

JB: Gives Intel a lot of credit because it will ultimately help the economy.

WT: Doing it because they’ve realized they haven’t been as innovative over the years and that they are missing with customers and employees. Not doing for altruism. It will ultimately help them be a better, more innovative company.

ML: There is a Pixar exhibit now touring the country. The opening video is a branding video.  Women in leadership roles feature heavily in the individual exhibit videos.

 

 

Q: Two years from now, what will be the state of employer branding?

ML: Not enough investment in employer branding currently. Have examples of what is happing now and can build off of that.

WT: Conference and Live Stream attendees get it. HE hopes that in two years, 10K people will be attending this conference.

JB: Glassdoor will be 10X bigger. You’ll have Glassdoor inside your company and that will provide you with continuous feedback.

 

 


 

The Transparent Organization: 30 Tips in 30 Minutes

Rob Reid, CEO, Intacct; Celinda Appleby, Head of Global Recruitment Branding, Oracle; and Alison Hadden, Head of Brand Strategy, Glassdoor
(Video – 43:43) (SlideShare)

 

Rob Reid: 10 Transparent Leadership Strategies

  1. Begin from the inside out – Have a compelling mission
  2. Find the right people to join you – Do they have the right values/behaviors
  3. Create shared accountability – Mutually agreed upon objectives
  4. Be open to change – Improvement requires trying new things
  5. Establish a culture of open communication – People need to understand what is going on in an organization- positive and negative
  6. Create channels that empower employees to provide feedback – Measure everything to allow for meaningful conversations
  7. Don’t bury problems…bring them to light – Get all stakeholders involved in finding a solution/make an impact
  8. Attack processes, not people – Performance issues are caused by process issues
  9. Develop empathetic leaders – Leaders are constantly trying to understand how to be better
  10. Follow the Platinum Rule – “Do unto others as they would want to have done unto them.”  Don’t assume that what you want is what they want.

 

Celinda Appleby: 10 Employer Branding Tips

  1. Begin with a content strategy
  2. Build your brand on real employee stories
  3. Stop talking and start communicating
  4. Be authentic
  5. Leverage employee-generated content
  6. Equip your employees to be brand advocates
  7. Don’t be a brand narcissist
  8. Ask for feedback and be ready to adapt
  9. Be data-driven
  10. If you fail, try again

 

Alison Hadden: 10 Stats & Stories from the Field

This presentation provided statistics from various surveys and reports that focus on trust.

 

 


 

10 key takeaways we learned from Glassdoor’s Employer Branding Summit

(SlideShare)

 

This presentation provides statistics on the attendees, live streamers, and social media shares. Below are the 10 key takeaways. The presentation provides more context for each of them.

  1. Transparency
  2. Human
  3. Evolution
  4. Powerful
  5. Measurement
  6. CX
  7. Differentiation
  8. Authenticity
  9. Marketer
  10. Mirror

 

 


 

 

What are your thoughts on these presentations? What was your key takeaway from each presentation? Stay tuned for the final part of the series.

 

 

Let’s Engage!

I’m Agent in Engagement Simpson…Gregory F Simpson.

 Employee engagement is a critical mission. I hope I can count on your help! Subscribe to the RSS Feed to receive the latest intelligence/insights and/or register to make entries in the comments log.

Photo of Gregory F SimpsonYou can follow me @agtinengagement.
Email me at g…@a…t.com.
Connect via LinkedIn at LinkedIn.com/in/GregoryFSimpson.
Learn more about me at gregoryfsimpson.com.

 

 

P.S.  First contact? Welcome to the Agent In Engagement community. Explore and join fellow employee engagement operatives in targeting a known thief – alias: Disengagement. Together we can bring this thief to justice and make the world a better place for all companies and their employees.

Other recent Agent in Engagement data/reports by Agent Gregory F Simpson:

 

 

 

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Filed under Conferences, Employees, Managers, Sr. Leadership

Glassdoor Employer Branding Summit Recap – Part 3 of 4

Employer Branding Summit 15

On Friday, September 25, 2015, Glassdoor hosted its second annual employer branding summit. For those unable to attend the event, Glassdoor offered a live stream which was recorded. Videos of the presentations are available on YouTube and the presentation materials have been posted on SlideShare. Below is a recap of presentations 7 – 9. Next week’s post will recap the final remaining presentations.

 

Glassdoor for Employers YouTube main link

Glassdoor for Employers SlideShare main link

Twitter hashtag: #GDSummit

 

 

 

Recruiter Branding: The Newest Element of Your Employer Branding Strategy

J.T. O’Donnell, Founder & CEO, Careerealism
(Video – 31:53) (SlideShare)

 

“Today’s job seekers want to connect with a person not a company.”

Job seekers no longer want to work for a company, they want to work with a company—partnership.

Job seekers are consumers, i.e. they mimic consumer behavior.  This means they research (81%) your company so they can make an informed decision. A dedicated careers page and a basic Glassdoor profile are expected to be seen as legitimate.

A recruiter bridges the gap between an employer brand which represents the company / leadership viewpoint about what it is like to work for the company and the talent brand which is what your employees say it is like to work for your company.  Need to be consistent between the two. The solution lies with the recruiter brand since they are part of both worlds.

What are the expectations of a recruiter brand:

  • People want proof of recruiter experience
  • Be authentic and transparent
  • Create the opportunity for a personal relationship, i.e., make it easy for people to find commonality.

 

94% [of job seekers] would find it helpful to have a Recruiter Directory. Careerealism just released the first recruiter directory.  All company information in one place.  Includes information for job candidates and recruiter’s perspective sections.

 

Lars Schmidt stepped in to open a Q&A session with J.T. O’Donnell. He encouraged the use of signature lines in emails. They should provide links to your Twitter accounts, etc.  When roles are posted, the names of the responsible recruiters should be included. Make it easy to connect and interact.

 

Q: How do you balance the time between candidates you want to pursue and those you do not?

A: Build and auto generated form for anyone that reaches out to you. Manage expectations. Give candidates a framework for what is happening. Refer them to Glassdoor, Twitter, etc. Give some careers resources and close loop on rejection. Hootsuite posted their process templates to HROS.co – download for free.

 

Q: Mr. Schmidt flipped the discussion and asked attendees to share their company’s practices.

A: To better engage creative types, a recruiter created an interactive, visual job description and a collateral piece that is sent to candidates.

A: For onsite interviews, candidates are given a free docu-sign account in confirmation email regardless of whether hired or not.

A: A company created 5 videos of actual employees in a certain role explaining that role and then sends them out to candidates so they can get a feel for role responsibilities, personalities, etc. Added benefit is that they may actually see those people when they visit the office.  Also created a fun video that is sent to candidate upon completing the application process online to let them know that their application was received and that someone will get back to them.

 

Automated response emails are the most valuable for setting expectations according to Mr. Schmidt.  Add FAQs, tell them what happens in the process, timeline, etc.  JT O’Donnell added that 44% of candidates will not apply to a company again if they received no response to their previous application. They assume the company isn’t interested.

Not many companies have Service Level Agreements (SLAs) in place for responding to candidate applications.

 

Summary

Recruiter branding is relatively new. As you go forward, you’ll need to figure out what are the most important and impactful things you can do and then prioritize them. Ultimately, you want to find a way to respond to every candidate that applies.

 

 


 

 

The Employer Brand Action Plan For Those That Don’t Know Where to Start

Stacy Zapar, Principal & Founder, Tenfold Employer and Brand Strategist, Greenhouse
(Video – 30:21) (SlideShare)

 

“Sourcing is like fishing.”  “Employer branding is like casting a net.”

83% [of companies, HR execs] agree that an employer brand has a significant impact on the ability to hire great talent.

What if you don’t have a strong brand, if you don’t attract the right talent, or don’t have a clue about what your employer brand is? 50% of recruiters don’t understand their own employer brand.

You can build an employer brand by starting small and then build on your success.

An employer brand (a realistic story of what it’s like to really work at your company) is composed of four things:

  • Employee value proposition
  • Company culture
  • People (current, past, clients, etc.)
  • Candidate experience

 

Gameplan:

  • Research: good, bad, average. Locations, teams, offices all have different cultures.
  • Ask Questions: Employee surveys, focus groups, one-on-one talks, etc.
  • Social listening – People are talking about you online whether you are joining the conversation or not.
  • Identify core values/ develop an EVP
  • Establish the goals of an employer branding program  using internal and external data
  • Provide social training for employees
  • Build an employer brand roadmap and realize it will evolve over time
  • Take inventory of relevant content

The MEH

PR Awards

Marking/ corp blog

Earning announcements

Job postings

Corp social responsibly

Company benefits

The WOW

Work currently being done is the most popular content

Co Culture/ day in the life

Department/ employee blogs

Office environment/ cube life

Employee spotlights.

Unique perks and benefits

Candid photos/ iPhone videos

Company events

In the news

Asking questions

Career strategies

Humor/ memes

Relevant quotes

 

@PRSarahEvans: “Great content makes people want to share, care or swear.

 

Checklist:

  • What’s in a name? Everything.  Think like a marketer for blog name, projects, etc. What resonates with employees. It must be memorable and represent your brand
  • A unique and consistent hashtag
  • Establish pillars of content. On what subjects will you be focusing. Be sure to keep passive candidates in mind.
  • Develop a measurement plan
  • Develop a content curation strategy
  • Develop a community management plan – who runs/managers
  • Develop a content calendar
  • Set up a blog: tell employee stories
  • Establish an engaging careers page
  • Branded, innovative job postings that are mobile friendly and use video, pictures, etc.
  • Develop a Glassdoor strategy: Good content, Regular status updates, a Response strategy, and an  Engagement strategy to get people involved (candidates and employees)
  • Focus on candidate experience

 

 


 

 

 

Standing Out from the Crowd: What it takes to be different

Richard Mosley, VP Strategy, Universum
(Video – 27:30) (SlideShare)

 

Mr. Mosely is a former anthropologist. He noted that strong cultures and strong brands have a lot in common. For instance, they are sure of themselves – know what they stand for.

Consumer brands and employer brands are the same.  How stand out with what offering.

Mr. Mosely listed the Top 35 of the world’s most attractive employers 2105. These are good companies but they fail to stand out among the competition.

Many companies use same buzz words. In the banking sector, “a world of opportunity,” is on example. 20 companies use this same phrase. In the technology sector, “Innovation is in our DNA” is used by a lot companies.

Visually, most of these companies use the same mix of people to denote inclusion and diversity:  2 men, 2 women, an ethic mix…and sitting around a table and smiling.

Too many companies are positioning themselves the exact same way. “It’s not easy to be different”

Employment Brand is the foundation of all a company does.

 

Three ways to stand out:

Visual identity: Look different. You cannot limit this to your career page or job postings, you must be consistent across the company for the visual identity to successful.

Brand positioning: talk different

Mr. Mosely talked about 8 territories: status, purpose, teamwork, empowerment, learning, career, performance. Companies need to understand where they fit within each territory and determine what makes them unique in each.

Signature experiences: BE different

 

 

 


 

 

What are your thoughts on these presentations? What was your key takeaway from each presentation? Stay tuned for the final part of the series.

 

 

Let’s Engage!

I’m Agent in Engagement Simpson…Gregory F Simpson.

Employee engagement is a critical mission. I hope I can count on your help! Subscribe to the RSS Feed to receive the latest intelligence/insights and/or register to make entries in the comments log.

Photo of Gregory F SimpsonYou can follow me @agtinengagement.
Email me at g…@a…t.com.
Connect via LinkedIn at LinkedIn.com/in/GregoryFSimpson.
Learn more about me at gregoryfsimpson.com.

 

 

P.S.  First contact? Welcome to the Agent In Engagement community. Explore and join fellow employee engagement operatives in targeting a known thief – alias: Disengagement. Together we can bring this thief to justice and make the world a better place for all companies and their employees.

Other recent Agent in Engagement data/reports by Agent Gregory F Simpson:

 

 

 

Comments Off on Glassdoor Employer Branding Summit Recap – Part 3 of 4

Filed under Conferences, Employees, Managers, Programs, Recruiting, Sr. Leadership

Glassdoor Employer Branding Summit Recap – Part 2 of 4

Employer Branding Summit 15

On Friday, September 25, 2015, Glassdoor hosted its second annual employer branding summit. For those unable to attend the event, Glassdoor offered a live stream which was recorded. Videos of the presentations are available on YouTube and the presentation materials have been posted on SlideShare. Below is a recap of presentations 4 – 6. Future posts will recap the remaining presentations.

 

Glassdoor for Employers YouTube main link
Glassdoor for Employers SlideShare main link
Twitter hashtag: #GDSummit

 

 

 

An Ecosystem Approach to Close More Passive Talent

Jennifer Johnston, Senior Director Marketing and Communications, Salesforce
(Video – 25:50) (SlideShare)

“In the war for talent, scarcity is the new reality.” “Power is continuing to shift to the candidate.”

Salesforce developed a recruiting ecosystem to focus on engaging and enabling everyone in the company to sell the EVP (employer value proposition) across the recruiting lifecycle.

The five steps of this approach were:

  1. Targeted Lead Generation

Define your audience and drive leads through referrals, advertising, and research.

Referrals: Programs created to get information to employees about the referral process / information on the company’s hiring needs. They will even help employees go through their contacts to determine potential referrals.

Advertising: Since their candidates are in a narrow market, they must target where they focus.  Use contests and games to attract / engage candidates.

Research: 8 referral leads vs. 154 non-referral leads to get a hire. Used data to disrupt the perceptions of hiring managers on what skills and traits are needed for certain roles. Developed a profile of the best candidate.

 

  1. Qualifying and Mapping

If do not meet profile, let them go nicely because there is a low probability they will be hired. No need to string them along.

If do meet the profile, they are put into nurturing activities if there are no current roles available. If a role is available, then they are fed right into the process.

 

  1. Prequalified Prospect Nurturing

Build relationships to move people from prospect to candidate using three key nurturing tactics.

Look at media coverage, corporate, and employee created content and package it into:

Snackables – tidbits that are sharable

eBlasts – Best of the best content is sent to potential candidates in an email. Marketing then collects data on who opened, links clicked, etc. to help better focus the conversation.

Events – Most popular is to piggy back on customer events. Invite prospects and then allow them to mingle with Salesforce employees. This allows for an assessment of fit on both sides. Goal is have candidates think of you when they are ready to make a move.

 

  1. Amazing Candidate Experience

Weakest link at Salesforce right now. Goal is to close more candidates by engaging hiring managers since they can better assess fit and sell the opportunity.

Three tactics:

EVP Certification – managers trained / coached to better communicate the EVP.

Competencies Interviewing – helps deepen the line of questioning in interviews.

Candidate Journey – how best communicate with candidate along their journey.

Pre-interview team briefings so prepared for the candidate

Send tips and closers on day of interview

Pre-emptive thank you to the candidate after the interview

Ask for the sale at offer

Offer personal congrats and welcome communication at signing

Keep candidate engaged prior to start date using a pre-boarding journey

 

  1. Engaging Employee Experience

Referrals are #1 source of hires at Salesforce

Culture – greatest asset so make sure everyone can speak about the culture.

Hire for fit, immerse quickly, and live the culture every day – inside and outside of the company.

 

How measure success?

Enthusiastic shares on social media, blogs, etc.

Fair reviews on sites such as Glassdoor

Regular employee referrals to maintain potential candidate pipeline


 

 

 

Using Glassdoor to Build Candidate Trust & Employee Engagement

Christopher Hannegan, EVP Employee Engagement, Edelman PR
Jennifer Newbill, Senior Manager of Global Talent, Dell
(Video – 30:24) (SlideShare)

Mr. Hannegan began by talking about today’s trust landscape. Edelman trustbarometer, the largest global study of trust. Focused on two bits of data in the study

“Company experts, “person like yourself” most trusted.”

Percentage of people considered credible when wanting information about a company:
67% – technical experts
63% – person like yourself
49% – employee
43% – CEO

Who is most trusted based on a specific topic?  Looked at engagement, integrity, products, purpose, and operations. Most compelling were in:

Engagement: Treat employees and customers well. Credibility – 41% employee to 21% CEO
Integrity: ethical business practices. Credibility – highest was 34% employee.

Opportunities:
How can we elevate and amplify the technical expert and employee voices?  Label your people as experts.
How do we build trust with our workforce as a starting point to build trust with customers and potential talent? Has to start internally.
How can a company keep engaging via Glassdoor and other sites throughout the talent lifecycle? Mine data from these sites to enhance employee engagement strategies.

Mr. Hannegan turned the presentation over to Jennifer Newbill. Ms. Newbill walked through a Dell case study.

Transparency is a core founding belief at Dell.
Certify employees to me social media advocates though Social Media and Communities University

A recruiter received feedback from a candidate about a negative experience.  The candidate said that 1) he was not interested in Dell; 2) he would not refer anyone; and 3) he would never be a customer. That jolted Dell to understand that candidates are customers. What’s worse, that candidate went on to a role in which he was responsible for $2 billion of technology procurement.

Candidate experience program was created that made specific commitments to candidates and those commitments were posted online to ensure accountability.

How (and why) Dell embraced Glassdoor – 6 steps:
Step 1 – Making the case (within our own recruiting team) – getting buy-in from the right people
Step 2 – Assessing our Glassdoor presence
Step 3 – Branding our page
Step 4 – Monitoring the sentiment and trends – review “Advice to Sr. Management”
Step 5 – Achieving buy-in from our Senior HR Executives
Step 6 – Roadshow – make Glassdoor part of the conversation within the company

Candidates as consumers:
Monitor and respond to reviews in a timely matter.
Educate stakeholders and team on an on-going basis.
Create a philosophy around soliciting reviews.


 

 

 

Employer Brand Strategies to Attract and Retain Millennials

Carolyn Eiseman, Enterprise Holdings
(Video – 20:11) (SlideShare)

Discussed Enterprise Holdings brands:

Global presence in 70 counties / 9000 retail locations
Privately held.
Decentralized operating structure – operating groups to manage clusters of retail locations.
200+ recruiters to hire for local operating groups.

Enterprise management training program  hires 8500 (millennials) each year. They are trained and developed to run branches and provide customer service.

Retail locations are the talent pipeline to senior leadership (promote from within). In an effort to show not tell, they added a ticker on their career site that provides a running count of the number of internal promotions each year. By the end of 2015, that count should be at 13K.

Engage where candidates are: Instagram, Twitter, and Glassdoor. Not only engaging with individuals but with their networks as well.

Strengths:
Strong employee referral program – incentives vary by operating group.  30-35% of hires come through referrals each year.
Why Care? Why Share? Approach. If employees care enough to share, then it’s important. Sometimes employee content can be repurposed / redeveloped for a corporate branding opportunity.
National internal meetings provide a broader focus than just the operating group with which they associate. They have the opportunity to meet and talk to senior leaders. For this last meeting, they created an app to encourage engagement prior to those meetings, during the meetings, and to keep in touch after the meetings. This became a good source of content for national promotions.

In 2015, they began to provide recruiters with content in order to be consistent in messaging. Over time, they’ve learned how to better engage potential candidates by posted certain types of information on specific channels, i.e. brand or local. For instance, career tips posts by recruiters yield 5-6X more engagement than the same post on from a brand channel.


 

 

 

 

What are your thoughts on these presentations? What was your key takeaway from each presentation? Stay tuned for part 3 of 4.

 

 

Let’s Engage!

I’m Agent in Engagement Simpson…Gregory F Simpson.

Employee engagement is a critical mission. I hope I can count on your help! Subscribe to the RSS Feed to receive the latest intelligence/insights and/or register to make entries in the comments log.

Photo of Gregory F SimpsonYou can follow me @agtinengagement.
Email me at g…@a…t.com.
Connect via LinkedIn at LinkedIn.com/in/GregoryFSimpson.
Learn more about me at gregoryfsimpson.com.

 

 

P.S.  First contact? Welcome to the Agent In Engagement community. Explore and join fellow employee engagement operatives in targeting a known thief – alias: Disengagement. Together we can bring this thief to justice and make the world a better place for all companies and their employees.

Other recent Agent in Engagement data/reports by Agent Gregory F Simpson:

 

 

 

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Glassdoor Employer Branding Summit Recap – Part 1 of 4

Employer Branding Summit 15

On Friday, September 25, 2015, Glassdoor hosted its second annual employer branding summit. For those unable to attend the event, Glassdoor offered a live stream which was recorded. Videos of the presentations are available on YouTube and the presentation materials have been posted on SlideShare. Below is a recap of the first three presentations. Future posts will recap the remaining presentations.

 

Glassdoor for Employers YouTube main link
Glassdoor for Employers SlideShare main link
Twitter hashtag: #GDSummit

 

 

Welcome Address

Robert Hohman, CEO, Glassdoor
(video – 19:00) (SlideShare)

 

Robert Holman, CEO, Glassdoor kicked off the conference with a presentation on the importance of an employer brand. “Employer branding is more than a business or marketing decision, it’s a human decision.”

 

Your employer brand impacts both the company and its employees. According to the Edelman “trustbarometer,” 1/3 of all respondents say employees are their most trusted source of information about a company.

 

“Employer branding is critical as transparency is the new normal.” It determines whether employers want to work with you and if those outside of the organization, i.e., investors, partners, vendors, etc., want to do business with you. Trip Advisor, Yelp, Rotten Tomatoes, and Zillow are examples of how transparency is impacting businesses. Each of these sites provides rich feedback.

 

People want insight and are willing to share with others in order to get it in turn. People help other people make better decisions.

 

“Glassdoor delivers 2x better applicant quality compared to traditional job boards.” It takes half as many resumes to get to a hire because applicants can determine whether a particular company is a good fit for them.  And with 30 million unique users a month, Glassdoor is the fastest growing job site in the US.

 

“The human aspect of brand is impacting how effective you are at recruiting.”

 

With a strong employer brand, companies can actually pay less to get more productive people. The flip side is that you’ll pay a premium for people if you employer brand isn’t strong.


 

 

 

Keynote Presentation: Transparent Leadership

Spencer Rascoff, Zillow Group)
(Video – 29:35) (SlideShare)

 

One of the CEOs responsibilities is employer branding.

 

What does a CEO do?

According to Fred Wilson, Venture Capitalist, CEOs have 3 priorities:

  1. Set over all vision and strategy of the company and communicates it to all stakeholders.
  2. Recruit, hire, and retain the very best talent for the company.
  3. Make sure there is always enough cash in the bank.”

 

Zillow focuses on empowerment, accessibility, and honesty

 

Empowerment

  • Mission-driven. What do you stand for? Everyone at Zillow recites the mission at the beginning of every meeting.
  • Core Values: Zillow waited 3-4 years before they defined their core values and they are woven into all parts of the organization.
  • Common language: Established buyer personas. This provides a short cut in discussions where new features or products are debated.
  • Plays: The entire company rallies around a single focused effort for 6 months to 1 year. It becomes the overarching focus.
  • Hack Weeks to encourage innovation. Then follow through to incorporate the innovations and celebrate the contributions of the week.
  • Interaction: Removed all doors and sometimes chairs. No offices at Zillow.
  • Perks: Types of perks say a lot about a company. Always be aware of how perks are perceived.
  • Decision-making: To understand a company, you must consider how decisions are made and how resources get allocated. Zillow Group is a Consensus driven data meritocracy.

 

Accessibility

  • Being a Social CEO: listen, make sure people can find you and that you are where the conservations are happening. Use social to interact with employees and to engage investors.
  • Use events to position company as a leader.
  • Everything ties back to recruiting.

 

Honesty (Authenticity)

  • Hard to recreate another company’s culture: Share what the company is doing around its mission, vision, core values, etc.
  • Know yourself as a CEO and know when you need to change.
  • Use your bench: Focus on what you are great at and let others do what they are good at.

 

And that’s the “full formula to being a transparent CEO.”


 

 

 

CEO Fireside Chat

Spencer Rascoff, Zillow Group and Robert Hohman, CEO, Glassdoor
(Video – 31:29)

 

This segment featured a Q&A session with Spencer Rascoff and Robert Holman.

 

How do you use the feedback from Glassdoor? 

Zillow uses a person to triage the feedback and then that person sends the feedback to one of 5 executives who have the responsibility to respond.  This feedback process has to be a focus of the CEO. It takes humility to approach comments – especially negative ones. Acknowledge apologize and respond to negative feedback.

 

Tom Larkin research: People have been trained to consume online reviews. They classify online reviews into 3 categories: the crazies; personal stories don’t match their experience; and the  common thread.

 

Outside companies use Glassdoor information too because it gives window into the soul of the company. Investors, partners, vendors and recruiters are examples.

 

Setting realistic expectations is a key to preventing negative feedback.

You want to meet or exceed people’s expectations. The problems come when the expectations are not met.  At the 12:50 marks of the video, new hire employee expectations are discussed. Mr. Rascoff stated that a company’s mission and culture are only things that are important. Mr. Holman agreed. It seemed that they were dismissing the other aspects of employee engagement.

 

 

 

 

How use Glassdoor analytics to make case in favor of establishing an employer brand to senior leadership?

One measure is the volume of people researching their company.    Mr. Rascoff mentioned that if senior leadership believes that talent is important, they immediately jump directly to compensation as an assumed means of retention.  Autonomy, mastery, purpose, and mission are the most important to employees if they feel they are fairly compensated.

 

How handle CEO resistance to focusing on the employer brand?

If the CEO isn’t onboard, go to marketing as a workaround Do not go to finance because creating and employer brand costs money! Laugh. Employment and product brands are two strands of company DNA.

 

What advice do you have for companies that don’t want to respond to negative reviews?

You need to be part of the conversation. On Glassdoor, if someone posts a negative comment, the company gets to respond and that’s it. There is no back and forth to worry about.

 

Who owns employer branding?

For both Zillow and Glassdoor, HR and Marketing own employer branding. Employer branding cannot be siloed in HR.


 

 

What are your thoughts on these presentations? What was your key takeaway from each presentation? Stay tuned for part 2 of 4.

 

 

Let’s Engage!

I’m Agent in Engagement Simpson…Gregory F Simpson.

Employee engagement is a critical mission. I hope I can count on your help! Subscribe to the RSS Feed to receive the latest intelligence/insights and/or register to make entries in the comments log.

Photo of Gregory F SimpsonYou can follow me @agtinengagement.
Email me at g…@a…t.com.
Connect via LinkedIn at LinkedIn.com/in/GregoryFSimpson.
Learn more about me at gregoryfsimpson.com.

 

 

 

P.S.  First contact? Welcome to the Agent In Engagement community. Explore and join fellow employee engagement operatives in targeting a known thief – alias: Disengagement. Together we can bring this thief to justice and make the world a better place for all companies and their employees.

Other recent Agent in Engagement data/reports by Agent Gregory F Simpson:

 

 

 

Comments Off on Glassdoor Employer Branding Summit Recap – Part 1 of 4

Filed under Conferences, Employees, Managers, Programs, Recruiting, Social Media, Sr. Leadership, Videos